Do I have a Breast Abscess?

An abscess is the body’s way of dealing with an infection—by sealing it off to prevent the infection from spreading. Although rare in the breastfeeding mother, an abscess in the breast requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. This article looks at the symptoms, diagnosis and treatment pathways for a breast abscess.

What is a breast abscess?

A breast abscess will usually be felt as a very painful, swollen lump, inside the breast. It may be near the surface of the breast and have the characteristics of a boil or large spot or it may be much deeper inside the breast. Inside the lump there will be inflammation and an accumulation of pus—a thick liquid that contains dead tissue, cells and bacteria. The lump is caused by an infection, typically by the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus1.

What are the symptoms of a breast abscess?

Aside from the physical presence of a painful lump, a mother may also have a temperature and flu-like symptoms. The skin on the breast above the lump may look very red or feel hot to touch. A doctor will give a firm diagnosis and urgent medical treatment is required if an abscess is confirmed. Not all breast lumps are abscesses as there are several other causes of lumpy breasts during breastfeeding—see Breast Lumps for further information.

Diagnosis of a breast abscess

A breast abscess can be diagnosed by ultrasound and a sample of the fluid in the middle of the lump can be removed with a fine needle for testing.

What causes a breast abscess?

A mother is most likely to develop a breast abscess if she has had a prolonged period of painful engorgement (excess milk staying in the breast) and infective mastitis (breast inflammation) that wasn’t treated promptly or appropriately. Stopping breastfeeding abruptly during mastitis is also a risk factor for developing a breast abscess. Keeping the breasts comfortably drained by breastfeeding, hand expressing or pumping during a mastitis episode is the best way to avoid a breast abscess. However, occasionally a breast abscess can develop very quickly with little warning. Breastfeeding mothers are most at risk of an abscess during the first month after delivery (Kataria et al, 2013) and there is a higher risk of an abscess if a mother smokes or is obese2 .

How to treat a breast abscess

An abscess needs immediate treatment. Abscesses are treated by draining away the collected pus in one of three ways: needle aspiration, catheter drainage or surgical incision and drainage, and antibiotics are usually prescribed. Which method to use can depend on the size of the breast abscess. Needle aspiration and antibiotics tend to be used for abscesses less than 3cm diameter and catheter drainage in abscesses larger than 3cm. Ultrasound guided aspiration in an outpatient clinic can be used for all sizes of abscess; although repeat drainage may be necessary, it causes less scarring and avoids surgery3.

Needle aspiration

A very fine needle attached to a syringe is inserted into the centre of the abscess and the pus is drawn up in the syringe. A sample can be sent away for culturing so the correct treatment can be identified. Needle aspiration may need repeating more than once over a period of a few days and antibiotics will be needed.

Catheter drainage

A thin tube is inserted into the abscess through the skin to provide an outlet for the pus to drain. Dr Jack Newman recommends catheter drainage and antibiotic treatment rather than surgical incision and drainage and shares the following plan in his book Dr. Jack Newman’s Guide to Breastfeeding (updated edition):

1. The abscess is located and “mapped” with ultrasound.

2. A catheter is placed in the abscess, as far as possible from the nipple and areola, and left there.

3. The mother is encouraged to continue feeding on both breasts.

4. Antibiotic treatment is continued until the catheter is taken out.

5. The catheter is withdrawn when there is no further drainage from the abscess. This can be done by a nurse who visits the mother at home.

Wei et al describe a similar technique with good results using a drain tube and negative suction pressure to draw out the pus through a small incision4.

Surgical incision and drainage

A surgeon cuts into the abscess to release the pus and during the healing period a drainage system remains in place for any remaining pus to drain from the site. Antibiotics will also be prescribed. If surgical incision and drainage are needed, it is important to minimise the damage to glandular tissue. The incision should be as far away from the nipple as possible to make breastfeeding and pumping easier. And if the incision is made from the nipple towards the chest wall rather than across the ducts/around the breast there will be less damage to the milk ducts5.

Antibiotics

Alongside techniques to remove the infected material from the abscess, antibiotics are prescribed. See The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine’s Clinical Protocol #4 for a discussion of which antibiotics are recommended and dosage.

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Can a breast abscess go away with antibiotics?

Kataria et al explain that in the early stages of an abscess formation (cellulitic phase), antibiotics can resolve the infection but once an abscess has formed, removing the pus (aspiration) is the first line of treatment.

During the cellulitic phase, treatment with antibiotics may be expected to give rapid resolution. The predominance of S. aureus allows a rational choice of antibiotic without having to wait for the results of bacteriological culture. Erythromycin should be considered the drug of choice because it has high efficacy, is low cost, and has low risk of inducing bacterial resistance. Antibiotics should be continued for 10 days to reduce systemic infection and local cellulitis. Where an abscess has formed, aspiration of the pus, preferably under ultrasound control, has now supplanted open surgery as the first line of treatment. Regular natural milk emptying of the breast is an essential part of treatment.

How long does it take for a breast abscess to heal?

Wambach and Riordan6 write that abscesses greater than 3cm with catheter drainage will need the catheter in place for 3-7 days. For larger abscesses requiring an incision, they report that the incision heals from the inside out in a week or two. However Wilson-Clay and Hoover, the authors of The Breastfeeding Atlas, 2017, state that it is not unusual for the wound to take four to six weeks to heal after incision and drainage. They explain that the wound needs to heal slowly from the inside, if the process goes too quickly a fistula or milk fistula (abnormal healing) may form leading to more complications.

Milk leaking from the wound

It is common for breast milk to leak from the wound site during healing. Wilson-Clay and Hoover explain that this may be beneficial as breast milk contains various anti-inflammatory and immune factors that will help prevent infection. Covering the site with a dry, absorbent dressing—changing it as necessary—will usually be recommended by your health professional.

Can I carry on breastfeeding?

The National Health Service 7, NICE guidelines8, The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine 9 and La Leche League Great Britain (see excerpt below) advise continuing to breastfeed during treatment of a breast abscess. It is important to keep the breast well drained. If it is too painful to breastfeed directly then try pumping or hand expressing. Some mothers continue to feed on the unaffected side while allowing the breast with the abscess to dry up.

You can continue to breastfeed from both breasts. If the affected breast is too painful or the incision is close to your nipple you may need to hand-express for a day or two. Keeping your milk flowing will help your breast heal.

What if MRSA is diagnosed?

Staphylococcus aureus is a bacteria found on our skin that is often associated with a breast abscess. When strains of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (staph) are resistant to the usual antibiotics they are known as methicillin or meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In most cases by the time MRSA is diagnosed your baby will have already been exposed to the bacteria. Unless your baby is premature or very poorly, breastfeeding can usually continue uninterrupted while mother, or mother and baby, have treatment. MRSA can be spread by skin-to-skin contact so special hygiene precautions will be needed if you have an MRSA infected wound. For further information and recommendations if you have MRSA on the breast, especially if it is close to the nipple, see Staph, MRSA and Breastfeeding.

Not an abscess?

Occasionally breast cancer can present with similar symptoms to a breast abscess so it is important that a mother is under the care of her specialist physician. There are also other causes of breast lumps.

Summary

A breast abscess is a rare condition in a breastfeeding mother and usually follows a clear period of prolonged engorgement and infective mastitis. If you suspect you have an abscess the recommendations are to keep your breast milk flowing by frequent breastfeeding, hand expressing or pumping, and seek urgent treatment from your health care professionals.